Blog

Elfquest Reference List

This past July I was scheduled to present at The Comics Arts Conference at San Diego Comic Con. Because the conference was canceled when the con went online, I was invited to present next July. I am really hoping that we have COVID-19 under control before then. I have always wanted to attend Comic Con.Continue reading “Elfquest Reference List”

August 2020 Reading List

Here’s a list of all the indie comics and graphic novels that I read in August 2020 with brief descriptions and information on where I found each publication. I was pretty broke throughout August: as an academic, I don’t get paid over the summer. By the end of the summer, I was scraping by. Therefore, most of the comics I read came from Humble Bundle purchases in July.

July 2020 Reading List

Here’s a list of all the indie comics and graphic novels that I read in July 2020 with brief descriptions and information on where I found each publication. Graphic Novels Always Punch Nazis, vols. 1 & 2 *Ben Ferrari (ed.)Awesome anthologies about fighting fascism, which are a welcome reprieve from news about people being abductedContinue reading “July 2020 Reading List”

June 2020 Reading List

Here’s a list of all the comics, graphic novels, comic-related books, zines, and other small press publications that I read in June 2020 with brief descriptions and information on where I found each publication. Graphic Novels The Beats: A Graphic History >Harvey Pekar (w), Ed Piskor (a), and othersThis “graphic history” is broken up intoContinue reading “June 2020 Reading List”

Notes on the Term Indie

Choosing to go with the term indie was a bigger decision than I anticipated when I first set out to create this blog. In considering my title, I worked through a number of the terms mentioned previously, and I explored some of the ways that comics people describe comics. In this post I work through some of that terminology to help readers see why I choose indie.

Using Zines in Schools

I wrote this piece as part of an academic conference workshop where I tried to show other college writing professors and K-12 language arts teachers what zines have to offer students and how teachers and professors might bring them into their classrooms. Alongside the presentation—of which this was a part, workshop participants tried their hand at creating zines. I reprint this piece here knowing that folks who read Indie Creator Explosion aren’t the primary audience. I am sure that you know much more about zines than I get into here. Still, you might not know how or why a college professor or K-12 writing teacher would be interested in them or what folks in academia might be doing with them. I get into a bit of that here.

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Follow My Blog

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

%d bloggers like this: